Buy this article for $3.95

Have a coupon or promotional code? Enter it here:

When you buy this article you'll get access to the ePub version, a downloadable PDF, and the ability to print the full article.

Source:

Nursing2015

August 2004, Volume 34 Number 8 , p 18 - 18

Author

  • LYNN C. HADAWAY RN,C, CRNI, MED

Abstract

Outline

  • SELECTED REFERENCES

    SUPPOSE you're caring for Mrs. Allen, who's just arrived in your unit after a colon resection. The primary care provider's order for Mrs. Allen reads: 1,000 ml dextrose 5% and 0.45% sodium chloride I.V. to KVO .

    Merely stating KVO (keep vein open) isn't acceptable; you need a flow rate. Consider the five “rights” for medication administration: right drug, right route, right dose, right time, and right patient. This order tells you the drug (or in this case, the fluid), the route, and the patient—but not the rate or time. An order for a KVO rate doesn't meet the standard for safe drug administration.

    Although the order specifies the volume of fluid container to be used, this isn't adequate. You also need to know the hourly rate of fluid appropriate for Mrs. Allen's condition (for example, 125 ml/hour) or the right time frame for the infusion (for example, every 8 hours). ...

To continue reading, buy this article for just $3.95.

Have a coupon or promotional code? Enter it here: