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Source:

Nursing2015

February 2004, Volume 34 Number 2 , p 73 - 73

Author

  • JOY UFEMA RN, MS

Abstract

© 2004 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc. Volume 34(2)             February 2004             p 73 Not the same as no care [INSIGHTS ON DEATH & DYING: COMFORT CARE]

UFEMA, JOY RN, MS

Joy Ufema pioneered the role of death-and-dying specialist at Harrisburg (Pa.) Hospital in 1973. She's currently clinical specialist at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center in Bel Air, Md., and at Harford Memorial Hospital in Havre de Grace, Md.

Recently, I was caring for a frail elderly woman who'd suffered a devastating stroke and then developed pneumonia, probably from aspiration. The physician recommended comfort care only, and my patient's daughter agreed. But every time I went into the room, she looked as if she expected me to do something for her mother. I felt as though we were letting her down. Shouldn't we at least have given her mother antibiotics to show that we were doing something?—C.J., ...

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