Source:

Nursing2015

May 2012, Volume 42 Number 5 , p 8 - 8 [FREE]

Authors

  • HILARY LABONTE RN
  • NAME WITHHELD

Abstract

Thank you for publishing "Think SAFE: Four Crucial Elements for Diabetes Education" (January, 2012).* It presents important information about diabetes education for nurses within healthcare systems. As an RN (and someone with a family member who has diabetes), I believe that SAFE is a great acronym to help nurses recognize the signs and symptoms of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia.We need to actively promote teaching tools similar to those the article describes to help educate patients and healthcare staff about diabetes.Regarding the "Horizontal Violence Survey Report" (January, 2012),* another subject that should be addressed is favoritism amongst the ranks. At my last job, I had coworkers who chronically came in late and shirked their duties. Thanks to Facebook, I discovered that many of these former colleagues were "friends" with the supervisors and managers. Favoritism and bullying have become easier thanks to social networking.This letter is in response to "Don't Abandon the 'Second

 

Thank you for publishing "Think SAFE: Four Crucial Elements for Diabetes Education" (January, 2012).* It presents important information about diabetes education for nurses within healthcare systems. As an RN (and someone with a family member who has diabetes), I believe that SAFE is a great acronym to help nurses recognize the signs and symptoms of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia.

 

We need to actively promote teaching tools similar to those the article describes to help educate patients and healthcare staff about diabetes.

 

Regarding the "Horizontal Violence Survey Report" (January, 2012),* another subject that should be addressed is favoritism amongst the ranks. At my last job, I had coworkers who chronically came in late and shirked their duties. Thanks to Facebook, I discovered that many of these former colleagues were "friends" with the supervisors and managers. Favoritism and bullying have become easier thanks to social networking.

 

This letter is in response to "Don't Abandon the 'Second Victims' of Medication Errors" (February, 2012).* My heart breaks for the RN who took her own life after a fatal medication error, her family, and the patient's family who suffered the loss of their loved one.

 

The question is, what precipitated this tragic event? Short staffing? 12+ hour shifts? Lack of checks and balances in the busy acute-care hospital setting? Just a guess, but this seasoned RN probably wouldn't have made such a mistake if conditions in her workplace protected her practice and facilitated patient safety.

 

Speculation can also point to inexperienced healthcare workers. New grads suddenly find themselves responsible for a high acuity patient population, yet they're often poorly prepared for what's required of them. Factor in a "bottom-line mentality" in the form of staff cuts, and you can start to see the demise of healthcare.

 

-HILARY LABONTE, RN

 

Pembroke, Mass

 

.

 

-NAME WITHHELD BY REQUEST

 

-NAME WITHHELD BY REQUEST

 

* Individual subscribers can access articles free online at http://www.nursing2012.com. [Context Link]

Playing it SAFE to improve diabetes care

Thank you for publishing "Think SAFE: Four Crucial Elements for Diabetes Education" (January, 2012).* It presents important information about diabetes education for nurses within healthcare systems. As an RN (and someone with a family member who has diabetes), I believe that SAFE is a great acronym to help nurses recognize the signs and symptoms of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia.

 
Figure. No caption a... - Click to enlarge in new windowFigure. No caption available.

We need to actively promote teaching tools similar to those the article describes to help educate patients and healthcare staff about diabetes.

Facebook "friending" can lead to favoritism

Regarding the "Horizontal Violence Survey Report" (January, 2012),* another subject that should be addressed is favoritism amongst the ranks. At my last job, I had coworkers who chronically came in late and shirked their duties. Thanks to Facebook, I discovered that many of these former colleagues were "friends" with the supervisors and managers. Favoritism and bullying have become easier thanks to social networking.

Bottom-line mentality contributes to errors

This letter is in response to "Don't Abandon the 'Second Victims' of Medication Errors" (February, 2012).* My heart breaks for the RN who took her own life after a fatal medication error, her family, and the patient's family who suffered the loss of their loved one.

The question is, what precipitated this tragic event? Short staffing? 12+ hour shifts? Lack of checks and balances in the busy acute-care hospital setting? Just a guess, but this seasoned RN probably wouldn't have made such a mistake if conditions in her workplace protected her practice and facilitated patient safety.

Speculation can also point to inexperienced healthcare workers. New grads suddenly find themselves responsible for a high acuity patient population, yet they're often poorly prepared for what's required of them. Factor in a "bottom-line mentality" in the form of staff cuts, and you can start to see the demise of healthcare.

-HILARY LABONTE, RN

Pembroke, Mass

.

-NAME WITHHELD BY REQUEST

-NAME WITHHELD BY REQUEST

* Individual subscribers can access articles free online at http://www.nursing2012.com. [Context Link]