Source:

Nursing2015

May 2009, Volume 39 Number 5 , p 8 - 8 [FREE]

Author

  • GAYLE B. STEARNS RN, BSN

Abstract

function set_JnlFullText_Print() { metaTag = document.createElement('meta'); metaTag.setAttribute('name','OvidPageId'); metaTag.setAttribute('content','JnlFullText_Print'); head = document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0]; head.appendChild(metaTag); return; } if (window.addEventListener) { // DOM Level 2 Event Module (NS 6+) // Firefox throws an uncaught exception error executing this // code, even though it seems to work. Adding a do nothing // try/catch clause around it for now, since the exection itself // appears to be innocuous try { window.addEventListener('onload',set_JnlFullText_Print(),false); } catch(e) {} } else if (window.attachEvent) { // IE 5+ Event Model window.attachEvent('onload',set_JnlFullText_Print); } // For anything else, just don't add the event Print Close Debating the ethics of organ donation DOI: 10.1097/01.NURSE.0000350742.80669.a8 ISSN: 0360-4039 Accession: 00152193-200905000-00005 Author(s):

STEARNS, GAYLE B. RN, BSN

Issue: Volume 39(5), May ...

 

I'm sorry the author decided she was opposed to organ donation when she was a nursing student, but I hope that when she's had years of experience caring for patients facing death in various situations she'll change her mind.

 

I've been providing patient care for 36 years, the last 25 in an ICU. I've been involved with all types of deaths and donations. End-of-life decisions are never easy, but our job as nurses is to provide options, answer questions, and provide support to patients and families, no matter what they decide.

 

GAYLE B. STEARNS, RN, BSN

 

Carbondale, Ill.