Source:

Nursing2015

October 2008, Volume 38 Number 10 - Supplement: Therapy Insider , p 2 - 2 [FREE]

Authors

Abstract

 

As people age, most are willing to change their driving habits, but few are willing to voluntarily stop driving. That's the conclusion of a study of 752 people over age 65 and living in the community.

 

The researchers interviewed or contacted the participants at 2-year intervals between 1994 and 2000. Over that period, many participants still living in the community changed their driving habits, some by driving only locally, others by driving only during the day. The factors influencing decisions to change included getting older, being dependent for instrumental activities of daily living, and having self-described poor eyesight. The study also found that women were three times more likely to give up driving than men and those with comfortable incomes were more likely to stop driving than those who made less money.

 
Figure. No caption a... - Click to enlarge in new windowFigure. No caption available.
 

Source: Unsworth CA, et al. To continue, modify or relinquish driving: Findings from a longitudinal study of healthy aging. Gerontology. 53(6):423-431, November 2007.

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