Source:

Nursing2015

September 2007, Volume 37 Number 9 , p 57 - 58 [FREE]

Author

  • Yvonne D'Arcy CRNP-BN, CNS, MS

Abstract


D'Arcy, Yvonne CRNP-BN, CNS, MS

Yvonne D'Arcy is a pain management and palliative care nurse practitioner at Suburban Hospital in Bethesda, Md., and a member of the Nursing2007 editorial advisory board. Figure. No caption available.

OVER THE LAST 5 years, changes in pain management practice include new medications, new pain-intensity rating scales, and the implementation of The Joint Commission standards for pain management. This survey is designed to measure nurses' knowledge and attitudes about current pain management standards and best practices. Please take a few minutes to complete it. We'll compile the results and publish an analysis in a future issue.

You can take this survey online at http://www.nursing2007.com ; it's fast, easy, and free. Or photocopy and fax these pages to 215-367-2155 or mail to Nursing2007 Pain Management Survey, ...

 

OVER THE LAST 5 years, changes in pain management practice include new medications, new pain-intensity rating scales, and the implementation of The Joint Commission standards for pain management. This survey is designed to measure nurses' knowledge and attitudes about current pain management standards and best practices. Please take a few minutes to complete it. We'll compile the results and publish an analysis in a future issue.

 
Figure. No caption a... - Click to enlarge in new windowFigure. No caption available.
 

You can take this survey online at http://www.nursing2007.com; it's fast, easy, and free. Or photocopy and fax these pages to 215-367-2155 or mail to Nursing2007 Pain Management Survey, 323 Norristown Rd., Suite 200, Ambler, PA 19002. Deadline for responses is September 28, 2007.

 

All questions pertain to your primary work setting. Share this survey with your colleagues and encourage them to participate too.

I. TRUE OR FALSE?

 

Please check T for true or F for false.

 

 

 

1. Increases in vital signs are an indication that the patient is experiencing pain.

 

[white square] True

 

[white square] False

 

 

2. Intramuscular injection is a good way to deliver pain medication.

 

[white square] True

 

[white square] False

 

 

3. A patient may sleep despite being in pain.

 

[white square] True

 

[white square] False

 

 

4. Depression is common in patients who have chronic pain.

 

[white square] True

 

[white square] False

 

 

5. A nurse can tell how much pain a patient is experiencing by closely observing him.

 

[white square] True

 

[white square] False

 

 

6. Behavioral pain scales using behaviors such as grimacing, moaning, or rubbing are effective for assessing pain in nonverbal patients.

 

[white square] True

 

[white square] False

 

 

7. Patients who exhibit behaviors such as clock-watching are showing signs of addiction.

 

[white square] True

 

[white square] False

 

 

8. Continuous infusion via patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) pumps is a good way to provide analgesia for all patients.

 

[white square] True

 

[white square] False

 

 

9. Differences in mu (opioid) binding sites account for differences in patient response to opioids.

 

[white square] True

 

[white square] False

 

 

10. Management of neuropathic pain, such as diabetic neuropathy, often requires a combination of medications such as opioids and antidepressants for effective pain relief.

 

[white square] True

 

[white square] False

 

 

11. There is no ceiling or upper limit on how far you can increase doses of opioid medication to improve pain relief.

 

[white square] True

 

[white square] False

 

 

12. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs used for relief of mild pain cause few adverse reactions.

 

[white square] True

 

[white square] False

 

 

13. In patients with chronic pain, functionality may be a better measure of the efficacy of pain medication than decreased pain levels.

 

[white square] True

 

[white square] False

 

 

14. Giving a patient a placebo is a good way to tell if he's really having pain.

 

[white square] True

 

[white square] False

II. ADDICTION AND DEPENDENCY

 

Read the following information, then check the correct answer to the questions in this section.

 

* Addiction: a chronic neurobiologic disease characterized by four C's: craving for the substance, compulsive use, lack of control, and continued use despite harm

 

* Dependency: a state where the patient's body has become accustomed to the regular use of the medication. A withdrawal syndrome will occur if the medication is stopped abruptly.

 

 

 

15. What percentage of patients who receive opioids for short-term treatment of acute pain (1 to 3 days) will become addicted?

 

- less than 1%

 

- 25%

 

- 5%

 

- 50%

 

 

16. What percentage of patients who have chronic pain and use opioids for 1 year become addicted?

 

- less than 1%

 

- 25%

 

- 5%

 

- 50%

 

 

17. What percentage of addicted patients who abuse prescription opioids can be considered dependent on opioids?

 

- less than 1%

 

- 25%

 

- 5%

 

- 50% or more

 

 

18. How comfortable are you giving opioids regularly to a patient who's been taking opioids for 12 months to control chronic low back pain?

 

- very comfortable

 

- uncomfortable

 

- comfortable

 

- very uncomfortable

III. PCA SAFETY

 

 

19. Please check all of the following that apply to use of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) in your practice.

 

- Two nurses must sign when therapy is initiated and with all dosing changes.

 

- Standard order sets are used for PCA.

 

- Annual competency on PCA use is required to assess your ability to correctly enter dose settings and parameters.

 

- Nurse-activated PCA or PCA by proxy is permitted.

 

- Standardized education on PCA use is provided to patients.

 

- PCA solutions and concentrations are standardized.

IV. ABOUT YOU

 

 

20. On a scale of 1 (not confident) to 5 (very confident), how confident are you that you answered most of the questions correctly? (Please circle a number.)

 

-

 

-

 

-

 

-

 

-

 

 

21. What is your highest educational level?

 

- student

 

- BS/BSN

 

- LPN/LVN

 

- MS/MSN

 

- RN diploma

 

- PhD or other doctoral degree

 

- AD

 

- other (please specify)---

 

 

22. What is your current position title?

 

- staff/primary care nurse

 

- charge nurse/assistant nurse-manager

 

- nurse-manager

 

- staff educator/case manager

 

- advanced practice nurse (CNS/NP)

 

- other (please specify)---

 

 

23. What is your primary work setting?

 

- hospital

 

- home health care/community health

 

- long-term/subacute care

 

- ambulatory/outpatient/clinic

 

- other (please specify)---

 

 

24. What is your primary clinical area?

 

- medical/surgical

 

- pediatrics

 

- perioperative

 

- orthopedics

 

- intensive care/critical care unit

 

- rehabilitation

 

- emergency department

 

- geriatrics

 

- oncology

 

- other (please specify)---

 

 

25. How would you describe the area where you practice?

 

- urban

 

- small town

 

- suburban

 

- rural

 

 

26. How many years have you been in nursing?

 

- 5 or less

 

- 11 to 15

 

- 6 to 10

 

- over 15

 

 

27. What is your age?

 

- under 21

 

- 41-50

 

- 21-30

 

- over 50

 

- 31-40

 

 

28. Are you certified in a specialty?

 

- yes

 

- no

 

 

29. We'd like to hear from you. On a separate sheet if necessary, please tell us what the biggest pain management challenge is in your practice or share any additional comments on this topic.

 

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