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Source:

Nursing2015

November 2005, Volume 35 Number 11 , p 26 - 27

Authors

  • KATHLEEN DUNLEAVY RN, CNA, CNRN, MA
  • ANN FINCK RN, C-NP, CCRN, CNRN, MSN
  • WINSOME OVERSTREET RN
  • MARY PRESCIUTTI RN, CCRN, CNRN

Abstract


DUNLEAVY, KATHLEEN RN, CNA, CNRN, MA; FINCK, ANN RN, C-NP, CCRN, CNRN, MSN; OVERSTREET, WINSOME RN; PRESCIUTTI, MARY RN, CCRN, CNRN

IN OUR HOSPITAL'S neurological intensive care unit (neuro ICU), subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is the most common condition we deal with—and one of the most challenging. This often-devastating neurological event, a type of hemorrhagic stroke, occurs when blood enters the subarachnoid space (the space between the arachnoid and pia mater meningeal layers). Bleeding is most often due to a ruptured aneurysm (a ballooning of a weakened region of a blood vessel) or a ruptured arteriovenous malformation (a cluster of abnormally formed blood vessels).

To identify trends and improve nursing care for patients with SAH, we conducted a retrospective chart review on our patients who've had an SAH. In this article, we'll discuss what we learned and how we changed nursing interventions based on our findings. ...

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