Source:

Nursing2015

August 2005, Volume 35 Number 8 , p 8 - 8 [FREE]

Author

  • MARILYN MASTERSON RN, BA, MSN

Abstract

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MASTERSON, MARILYN RN, BA, MSN

Manhattan, ...

 

You presented some helpful techniques in "Tailor Your I.V. Insertion Techniques for Special Populations" (May 2005). I'd like to add two more. First, if your patient is someone with a developmental disability, you need to thoroughly explain the procedure to him-and to not only appear calm, but to be calm. My young adult son who's disabled recognizes any stress around him and reacts to it almost immediately. If a nurse is rushed or stressed, he becomes anxious, which can cause vasoconstriction.

 

Second, laughter may be the best medicine for anyone who's anxious about a needle stick. When I was trying to cannulate a vein that was difficult to see, something struck my client as humorous. As she laughed, the vein appeared like magic and the cannulation was successful.

 

MARILYN MASTERSON, RN, BA, MSN

 

Manhattan, Kan.