Source:

Nursing2015

January 2005, Volume 35 Number 1 , p 11 - 11 [FREE]

Authors

  • PATRICIA MAGALDI RN, BSN
  • SANDRA STUERMER RN

Abstract

© 2005 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc. Volume 35(1)             January 2005             p 11 Women's rights around the world [LETTERS]

MAGALDI, PATRICIA RN, BSN; STUERMER, SANDRA RN

Litchfield, Conn. (MAGALDI)

Lookout Mountain, Ga. (STUERMER)

The comments appearing in this column are excerpted from readers' correspondence. Send your letter, complete mailing address, and credentials to: Letters Editor, Nursing2005 , 323 Norristown Rd., Suite 200, Ambler, PA 19002, or e-mail to nursing@lww.com. Please include your e-mail address and daytime telephone number .

I'd like to respond to Cheryl Mee's editorial supporting ratification of the Treaty for the Rights of Women (“Advocating for Women Worldwide,” Editor's Note , October 2004). The United Nations adopted this treaty in 1979 as the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, or CEDAW.

I've found that when something seems like a no-brainer, there's usually more to the story. Upon further research, I found that couched within the CEDAW is a radically feminist agenda promoting “reproductive choice,” a technical term for abortion and contraception, in countries where it's illegal. This is a fact they deny on their Web site, but their actions show otherwise. I believe this position actually hurts women, especially young girls, by making it easier for more powerful males in these societies to wash their hands of any responsibility toward women and their offspring.

Lack of educational and employment opportunities and cruel practices such as genital mutilation, sexual slavery, and domestic violence need to be addressed—the sooner the better. But be wary of groups using highly emotional rhetoric who might have hidden agendas. Be savvy: Check out the list of supporting organizations on the CEDAW Web ...

 

I'd like to respond to Cheryl Mee's editorial supporting ratification of the Treaty for the Rights of Women ("Advocating for Women Worldwide," Editor's Note, October 2004). The United Nations adopted this treaty in 1979 as the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, or CEDAW.

 

I've found that when something seems like a no-brainer, there's usually more to the story. Upon further research, I found that couched within the CEDAW is a radically feminist agenda promoting "reproductive choice," a technical term for abortion and contraception, in countries where it's illegal. This is a fact they deny on their Web site, but their actions show otherwise. I believe this position actually hurts women, especially young girls, by making it easier for more powerful males in these societies to wash their hands of any responsibility toward women and their offspring.

 

Lack of educational and employment opportunities and cruel practices such as genital mutilation, sexual slavery, and domestic violence need to be addressed-the sooner the better. But be wary of groups using highly emotional rhetoric who might have hidden agendas. Be savvy: Check out the list of supporting organizations on the CEDAW Web site (http://www.womenstreaty.org) and also check out others opposing this group, such as the Catholic Family and Human Rights Institute (http://www.c-fam.org).

 

-PATRICIA MAGALDI, RN, BSN

 

Litchfield, Conn.

 

Many of us are thankful that we live in a country that so far has proceeded with caution concerning the CEDAW treaty. A plethora of educated women (and men) as well as many religious and professional organizations have serious reservations about this treaty.

 

Your comments were the tip of the iceberg on the subject. I hope nurses realize that they need to explore the positions this treaty espouses before jumping on the CEDAW bandwagon.

 

-SANDRA STUERMER, RN

 

Lookout Mountain, Ga.

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