Source:

Nursing2015

December 2004, Volume 34 Number 12 , p 8 - 8 [FREE]

Author

  • CAROL BROWN LPN

Abstract

Graphics

  • Figure. No caption a...

    [black small square] In your article “How to Recognize and Respond to Child Abuse” (October 2004), you noted that spiral fractures in children are a telltale sign of physical abuse. I wonder if you've ever published information on osteogenesis imperfecta (OI).

    When my grandson had a fracture at age 6 months, my daughter was accused of child abuse. With much assistance from the Department of Children's Services caseworker, he was referred to a children's hospital for further evaluation. There we learned he had OI, a genetic defect that causes bones to break too easily, sometimes for no apparent reason. He's 5 now and has had six fractures—both femurs, ankle, clavicle, L1, and midthoracic.

    Health care workers should know the signs of OI, such as sclera with a blue, purple, or gray tint, and a tendency to spinal curvature. Families accused of child abuse may find that their child suffers ...

 

[black small square] In your article "How to Recognize and Respond to Child Abuse" (October 2004), you noted that spiral fractures in children are a telltale sign of physical abuse. I wonder if you've ever published information on osteogenesis imperfecta (OI).

 

When my grandson had a fracture at age 6 months, my daughter was accused of child abuse. With much assistance from the Department of Children's Services caseworker, he was referred to a children's hospital for further evaluation. There we learned he had OI, a genetic defect that causes bones to break too easily, sometimes for no apparent reason. He's 5 now and has had six fractures-both femurs, ankle, clavicle, L1, and midthoracic.

 

Health care workers should know the signs of OI, such as sclera with a blue, purple, or gray tint, and a tendency to spinal curvature. Families accused of child abuse may find that their child suffers from OI.

 

-CAROL BROWN, LPN

 

Dresden, Tenn.

 

The comments appearing in this column are excerpted from readers' correspondence. Send your letter, complete mailing address, and credentials to: Letters Editor, Nursing2004, 323 Norristown Rd., Suite 200, Ambler, PA 19002, or e-mail to nursing@lww.com. Please include your e-mail address and daytime telephone number.

[black small square] In your article "How to Recognize and Respond to Child Abuse" (October 2004), you noted that spiral fractures in children are a telltale sign of physical abuse. I wonder if you've ever published information on osteogenesis imperfecta (OI).

 
Figure. No caption a... - Click to enlarge in new windowFigure. No caption available.

When my grandson had a fracture at age 6 months, my daughter was accused of child abuse. With much assistance from the Department of Children's Services caseworker, he was referred to a children's hospital for further evaluation. There we learned he had OI, a genetic defect that causes bones to break too easily, sometimes for no apparent reason. He's 5 now and has had six fractures-both femurs, ankle, clavicle, L1, and midthoracic.

Health care workers should know the signs of OI, such as sclera with a blue, purple, or gray tint, and a tendency to spinal curvature. Families accused of child abuse may find that their child suffers from OI.

-CAROL BROWN, LPN

Dresden, Tenn.

The comments appearing in this column are excerpted from readers' correspondence. Send your letter, complete mailing address, and credentials to: Letters Editor, Nursing2004, 323 Norristown Rd., Suite 200, Ambler, PA 19002, or e-mail to nursing@lww.com. Please include your e-mail address and daytime telephone number.