Source:

Nursing2015

March 2004, Volume 34 Number 3 , p 12 - 12 [FREE]

Author

  • DEANNA COTNEY RN

Abstract

 

[black small square] My definition of a "good death" doesn't include any type of assisted suicide or euthanasia, but it does include a huge respect for the patient's wishes and the body's own natural processes when death approaches. Two common changes are the slowing of digestion and swallowing difficulties. Many people choose not to eat during this time because even one or two bites of food nauseates them. If they have trouble swallowing, they may aspirate, leading to pneumonia. Nausea and pneumonia aren't, in my opinion, conducive to a "good death."