Source:

Nursing2015

February 2004, Volume 34 Number 2 , p 8 - 8 [FREE]

Author

  • SUE HALL RN, MEd, MSN

Abstract

 © 2004 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc. Volume 34(2)             February 2004             p 8 Entry-level education for RNs [LETTERS]

HALL, SUE RN, MEd, MSN

Grants Pass, Ore.

Editor's note: Look for an in-depth examination of this controversy, including comments by Dr. Aiken, in next month's Issues in Nursing feature.

The comments appearing in this column are excerpted from readers' correspondence. Send your letter, complete mailing address, and credentials to: Letters Editor, Nursing2004 , 323 Norristown Rd., Suite 200, Ambler, PA 19002, or e-mail to nursing@lww.com. Please include your e-mail address and daytime telephone number .

As soon as I saw your recent news item, “RN Education: Research Results Stir Controversy,” I thought, Here we go again! ( Clinical Rounds , November 2003). The item described research headed by Linda H. ...

 

As soon as I saw your recent news item, "RN Education: Research Results Stir Controversy," I thought, Here we go again!! (Clinical Rounds, November 2003). The item described research headed by Linda H. Aiken, RN, PhD, linking BSN or higher educational levels with lower postoperative mortality rates. Apparently the BSN-as-entry-level-into-nursing zealots are alive and well.

 

This has been said before but needs to be said again. The nursing credits required for any National League for Nursing-accredited program, whether ADN, diploma, or BSN, are the same. The BSN graduate simply has more general-education support courses. This means the nursing degree is not what influences the graduate's performance, but rather the quality of the education, the nurse's personal dedication to excellence, and her experience in the field.