Source:

Nursing2015

November 2011, Volume 41 Number 11 , p 6 - 6 [FREE]

Author

  • Linda Laskowski-Jones MS, RN, ACNS-BC, CEN, FAWM

Abstract

November 2011 marks the 40th anniversary of Nursing: The Journal of Clinical Excellence. Nursing has undergone tremendous growth since its humble beginnings as a concept mapped out on the original editors' dining room table. The name, Nursing '71, would change with each passing year to reflect its editorial purpose: To keep nurses up-to-date on changes in nursing practice.1My connection to this journal spans my professional career. Reading letters from the early 1970s (see page 39) transported me back in time to my days as a nursing student. Some of my instructors wouldn't let us cite Nursing as a reference for care plans or papers, alleging it wasn't peer-reviewed. Actually, Nursing has been peer-reviewed since 1971, although it didn't publish references in those early years. Perhaps the informal, conversational style and having references "available upon request" gave instructors a sense that the content wasn't scholarly enough. I remember being disappointed because Nursing seemed such

 

November 2011 marks the 40th anniversary of Nursing: The Journal of Clinical Excellence. Nursing has undergone tremendous growth since its humble beginnings as a concept mapped out on the original editors' dining room table. The name, Nursing '71, would change with each passing year to reflect its editorial purpose: To keep nurses up-to-date on changes in nursing practice.1

 
Figure. No caption a... - Click to enlarge in new windowFigure. No caption available.
 

My connection to this journal spans my professional career. Reading letters from the early 1970s (see page 39) transported me back in time to my days as a nursing student. Some of my instructors wouldn't let us cite Nursing as a reference for care plans or papers, alleging it wasn't peer-reviewed. Actually, Nursing has been peer-reviewed since 1971, although it didn't publish references in those early years. Perhaps the informal, conversational style and having references "available upon request" gave instructors a sense that the content wasn't scholarly enough. I remember being disappointed because Nursing seemed such a practical resource. I subscribed anyway.

 

My first article in Nursing was published in 1993. I contributed frequently because Nursing offered access to a broad-based audience. It's gratifying to know that your words will reach nurses who can apply them directly to practice.

 

In 2000, I was appointed to Nursing's Editorial Advisory Board. In-text citations and reference lists became standard. Despite the editorial changes, our goal remained to provide valuable content in a reader-friendly format. After all, high-quality, evidence-based professional literature doesn't have to be a chore (or a bore) to read.

 

I became editor-in-chief in 2009. Since then, we've expanded our horizons to include research (Research Corner), performance improvement (Inspiring Change), and a venue for student authors (Student Voices). As times changed, our content has kept pace. I'd like to thank our founders, readers, authors, Nursing staff, editorial board members, and critics past and present for enabling us to achieve this milestone anniversary-your efforts define who we are and will continue to shape our future.

 

Until next time...

 

Linda Laskowski-Jones, MS, RN, ACNS-BC, CEN, FAWM

 
Figure. No caption a... - Click to enlarge in new windowFigure. No caption available.
 

Editor-in-Chief, Nursing2011 Vice President, Emergency, Trauma, and Aeromedical Services Christiana Care Health System, Wilmington, Del.

REFERENCE

 

1. Jackson EW. How one magazine went from 6,000 to 350,000 subscribers in four years. Folio: The Magazine for Magazine Management; 1975. [Context Link]