Source:

Nursing2015

December 2010, Volume 40 Number 12 , p 8 - 8 [FREE]

Authors

  • VALDA R. MCKAY BA, RN, CEN
  • LIA COHEN MPA, BS NURSING STUDENT

Abstract

Thank you for "Deciphering Clues in the CBC Count" (July 2010).* It's crucial that nurses know how to interpret their patients' complete blood cell (CBC) count results. For example, in my specialty area of women's health, the CBC count helps identify significant blood loss in gynecologic or obstetric patients.Complications may get overlooked if a white blood cell count is slightly elevated and a differential isn't considered carefully. For example, some less experienced nurses may not understand that elevated bands should raise a red flag for possible infection and sepsis.As nurses, we can recognize the early warning signs of complications and help to improve patient outcomes.-MELANIE TOCCI, RNWestport, Mass.I'm responding to a letter, "Bullying: In the Eye of the Beholder?" (October 2010). The writer commented, "Today, one isn't always able to sit someone down like a child and explain things repeatedly or even to say please and thank-you."I must disagree. As an RN with more than 20 years

Critical clues in the CBC count

 

Thank you for "Deciphering Clues in the CBC Count" (July 2010).* It's crucial that nurses know how to interpret their patients' complete blood cell (CBC) count results. For example, in my specialty area of women's health, the CBC count helps identify significant blood loss in gynecologic or obstetric patients.

 
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Complications may get overlooked if a white blood cell count is slightly elevated and a differential isn't considered carefully. For example, some less experienced nurses may not understand that elevated bands should raise a red flag for possible infection and sepsis.

 

As nurses, we can recognize the early warning signs of complications and help to improve patient outcomes.

 

-MELANIE TOCCI, RN

 

Westport, Mass.

Always time to be kind

 

I'm responding to a letter, "Bullying: In the Eye of the Beholder?" (October 2010). The writer commented, "Today, one isn't always able to sit someone down like a child and explain things repeatedly or even to say please and thank-you."

 

I must disagree. As an RN with more than 20 years of healthcare experience, I always find the time to say "please" and "thank-you" to my coworkers, patients, and everyone I deal with everyday. As professional nurses and as human beings, we all need to take the time to show kindness, respect, and patience toward others. We need to remember to treat others as we would like to be treated.

 

-VALDA R. MCKAY, BA, RN, CEN

 

Sister Bay, Wisc.

Influenza vaccines for healthcare workers

 

"Patient Education Series: Seasonal Influenza (The Flu)" (September 2010)* really got me thinking. Today fewer than 50% of healthcare workers receive influenza vaccinations, even though the CDC has recommended them since 1981 to protect colleagues and vulnerable patients.1 This statistic alarmed me!!

 

I think most healthcare workers, including nurses, would obtain seasonal influenza vaccinations if their employers encouraged and provided them. The time is long overdue for nurses and other healthcare workers to take care of themselves and their patients by getting vaccinated.

 

-LIA COHEN, MPA, BS NURSING STUDENT

 

Brooklyn, N.Y.

 

* Individual subscribers can also access these articles free online at http://www.nursing2010.com. [Context Link]

 

1. Sullivan P. Influenza vaccination in healthcare workers: should it be mandatory? Online J Issues Nurs. 2009;15(1). [Context Link]