Source:

Nursing2015

September 2010, Volume 40 Number 9 , p 8 - 8 [FREE]

Authors

  • JEANNE LINHART FNP-BC
  • NAME WITHHELD
  • JOE R. LACHER MSN, BSB, AAS, LPN, RN, NE-BC

Abstract

"Ruptured Ectopic Pregnancy" (Action Stat, July 2010)* was informative, but I believe some integral advice about this pregnancy loss was missing. The article mentions providing emotional support, which is important. But the patient, who had a history of endometriosis and had been trying to conceive for the past 6 months, should have also been referred for bereavement counseling with her partner.—JEANNE LINHART, FNP-BCSuffern, N.Y.An article in Nursing2010 saved my son's life. After sustaining a cervical spine fracture in a car crash, he experienced increasing neck pain. In the past few years, he consistently rated his pain as an 8 or a 9 on a scale of 0-to-10, but the family physician and pain management clinic we consulted wouldn't treat his pain. Staff at the clinic said that being in his early 20s put him at high risk for opioid addiction. My son was at the end of his endurance and had become suicidal.Then I read, "Is My Patient Drug-Seeking or in Need of Pain Relief?"

After ectopic pregnancy, bereavement

 

"Ruptured Ectopic Pregnancy" (Action Stat, July 2010)* was informative, but I believe some integral advice about this pregnancy loss was missing. The article mentions providing emotional support, which is important. But the patient, who had a history of endometriosis and had been trying to conceive for the past 6 months, should have also been referred for bereavement counseling with her partner.

 
Figure. No caption a... - Click to enlarge in new windowFigure. No caption available.
 

-JEANNE LINHART, FNP-BC

 

Suffern, N.Y.

Controlling pain saves a life

 

An article in Nursing2010 saved my son's life. After sustaining a cervical spine fracture in a car crash, he experienced increasing neck pain. In the past few years, he consistently rated his pain as an 8 or a 9 on a scale of 0-to-10, but the family physician and pain management clinic we consulted wouldn't treat his pain. Staff at the clinic said that being in his early 20s put him at high risk for opioid addiction. My son was at the end of his endurance and had become suicidal.

 

Then I read, "Is My Patient Drug-Seeking or in Need of Pain Relief?" (Controlling Pain, May 2010)* and showed it to my son. He cried to think that someone might listen. He agreed to let me contact the author, Paul Arnstein, for advice.

 

I'm pleased to report that my son is now a patient at the Cleveland Clinic, where he's receiving adequate pain relief for the first time. Instead of feeling suicidal, he's almost overwhelmed by all the possibilities for the future. I've seen my son smile a real smile for the first time in 9 years. None of this would have been possible without your article. Thank you so much for publishing it-and thank you, Dr. Arnstein, for finding someone to help us.

 

-NAME WITHHELD

Students and nursing licenses

 

In "Evidence-Based Practice: Dealing with Deviations" (Advice, P.R.N., July 2010),* I agreed with everything except this: "As you know, your students practice under your license." This statement isn't true for nurses practicing in Texas, where students practice under an exemption from the Board of Nursing.

 

-JOE R. LACHER, MSN, BSB, AAS, LPN, RN, NE-BC

 

Brownsville, Tex.

 

Editor's note: Check with your state board of nursing for the regulations governing nursing students in your state. Laws and regulations vary from state to state and are subject to change.

&NA;

 

* Individual subscribers can also access these articles free online at http://www.nursing2010.com. [Context Link]